Product Recall Did Not Prevent The Death Of Infant

Product recalls are the right thing to do when something proves it harms consumers. Unfortunately, the recall in this case did not prevent the death of a baby.

Family members of this six-month-old baby were utterly stunned when they checked him in his stroller and found him dead. The little boy had slid between the stroller tray and the seat, got stuck, and was strangled to death. Even though he was rushed to the local hospital, he was pronounced dead on arrival.

Unfortunately, the killer stroller had been bought at a garage sale and no one mentioned, or perhaps even knew, that it had been recalled by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. The model was the Graco Quattro, 7111BKW, called back due to the possibility of babies becoming trapped and strangling if not harnessed. The risk of strangulation was said to be highest in babies younger than a year old.

There is nothing more frightening and saddening than to find out that a child died despite a recall for a dangerous product. The people who bought the stroller at a garage sale had no idea it was dangerous. Did the people who sold the stroller? Possibly, and if they did know, and still sold the stroller anyway, it would seem they may be named in a wrongful death lawsuit.

As is stands, the maker of these strollers, despite having issued a recall, will be named in any lawsuit the parents may choose to file. The parents may also want to find out information about paying their bills and getting out of financial difficulties while they are waiting for their case to go to settlement or trial. In order to line up legal funding, they would just need to make contact with a lawsuit loan company or litigation funding company, and fill out an application for a lawsuit cash advance.

Getting pre-settlement funding once a case has been approved is a breeze, and it only takes about 24 to 48 hours or less for the funds to arrive in the plaintiff’s bank account. From there, they use the money to pay their medical and other pressing bills and then just sit back and wait for justice to be done.

During their wait, they may be approached by an insurance company wanting them to settle quickly and for a low amount. Thanks to having litigation funding in the bank, the plaintiff can turn them down flat, knowing they have money on tap to handle anything that might come up. Another benefit for plaintiffs applying for and being sent litigation funding is the fact that if they do lose their case in court, they still get to keep the money. That’s a good deal.

Daren Monroe writes for Litigation Funding Corp. To learn more about lawsuit &ufding and litigation funding, visit Litigationfundingcorp.com.

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