Alzheimer’s Caregivers Need Care Too

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s can take an immense toll on caregivers. From the emotional impact of watching a parent or spouse slowly decline as the disease takes hold, to the time commitment and financial impact of caregiving, caregivers often develop anxiety or depression.

Caregivers for people with Alzheimer’s need care to be able to cope with their situation, and getting care benefits both the caregiver and the patient.

The Strategies for Relatives (START) program educates participants about managing dementia patients, emotional support and planning for the future. A recent study presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Copenhagen found that even years later, participants had lower levels of depression and anxiety, as well as lower costs for care.

Some strategies for self-care when caring for an Alzheimer’s patient include:

  • Finding time for breaks – is there a time when your loved one can attend an activity or care center?
  • Joining an Alzheimer’s Association support group
  • Maintaining your physical health by cooking healthy meals and taking walks
  • Learning techniques for managing Alzheimer’s patients and experimenting with what works for your situation
  • Letting others in your life know what they can do to help

The elder law attorneys at Hook Law Center assist Virginia families with will preparation, trust & estate administration, guardianships and conservatorships, long-term care planning, special needs planning, veterans benefits, and more. To learn more, visit http://www.hooklawcenter.com/ or call 757-399-7506.

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s can take an immense toll on caregivers. From the emotional impact of watching a parent or spouse slowly decline as the disease takes hold, to the time commitment and financial impact of caregiving, caregivers often develop anxiety or depression.

Caregivers for people with Alzheimer’s need care to be able to cope with their situation, and getting care benefits both the caregiver and the patient.

The Strategies for Relatives (START) program educates participants about managing dementia patients, emotional support and planning for the future. A recent study presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Copenhagen found that even years later, participants had lower levels of depression and anxiety, as well as lower costs for care.

Some strategies for self-care when caring for an Alzheimer’s patient include:

  • Finding time for breaks – is there a time when your loved one can attend an activity or care center?

  • Joining an Alzheimer’s Association support group

  • Maintaining your physical health by cooking healthy meals and taking walks

  • Learning techniques for managing Alzheimer’s patients and experimenting with what works for your situation

  • Letting others in your life know what they can do to help

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