Mother and Two Infants Die of Undiagnosed Tuberculosis

A recent lawsuit alleges that medical malpractice led to the death of the plaintiff’s wife and his twin daughters when doctors failed to diagnose them with tuberculosis. The husband’s attorneys have stated that the suit has been filed to achieve accountability and justice from the Las Vegas Summerlin Hospital Medical Center. They have named medical professionals at the hospital and have claimed wrongful death and gross negligence. 

According to the statement filed with the lawsuit, 25-year-old Vanessa White was taken to Summerlin Hospital in May 2013. Allegedly, the staff did not follow required protocols in screening her for infectious diseases, which would have included tuberculosis. White had multiple symptoms that indicated the likely presence of the disease. 

While White was being treated at the hospital, her two children were born prematurely. The lawsuit alleges that their early birth was related to the failure to diagnose and treat tuberculosis.

White was allowed to roam the neonatal intensive care unit and care for her babies without wearing the required gloves and respiratory mask, a violation of hospital standards. One of her twins died in June and the other passed away in August. While she was in care, only White’s symptoms were treated. It was not until she died in July 2013 that she was diagnosed with tuberculosis. 

The lawsuit argues that medical personnel failed to meet the accepted standard of medical care — an observation backed by the plaintiff’s expert medical witnesses. A failure to diagnose and treat caused three deaths and spread of tuberculosis to others. More than 20 hospital employees were exposed to and contracted the disease, prompting the Nevada Occupational Safety and Health Administration to fine Summelin Hospital $39,600.

The medical bills involved in such cases are staggering. The surviving spouse would also need to find a way to pay for three unexpected funerals. 

Ideally, he could apply for litigation funding, also called pre-settlement funding, to deal with his overwhelming expenses. As the term “pre-settlement funding” suggests, he would receive funding before a settlement or verdict is reached. A lawsuit loan can allow plaintiffs to resist insurance companies who press them to settle for reduced awards quickly.

To apply for a lawsuit loan, he would need to work with his attorneys and provide the litigation funding representative with the details of the case and its probable chances of success. Once the case is assessed, the funds could be sent directly to his personal bank account within 48 hours. At that point, the debts may be paid and the remainder of the funds retained to help pay bills while the case makes its way to settlement or to trial.

Daren Monroe writes for Litigation Funding Corp. To learn more about lawsuit funding and litigation funding, visit http://www.litigationfundingcorp.com/.

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